The Event of the Cross 2

The messianic prophecies and types of Christ in the Old Testament that apply to the cross are too numerous to exhaustively cover in this essay.

Briefly…Abraham says to Isaac: “My son, God will provide himself a lamb for a burnt offering” (Gen. 22:8).

The blood of the Passover lamb was applied to the two sides and upper door lintel of the house, representing the human heart (Ex. 12:1-28).

The rock which Moses struck once with his rod in Horeb…to produce water out of the rock…is a type of Christ (Ex. 17:5-6; Jn. 4:14).

The bronze serpent on a pole is a preview of the cross (Num. 21:8-9; Jn. 3:14).  Psalms 22:16 says: “they pierced my hands and my feet.”

Psalms 22:17 foretells that the Romans did not break the legs of Jesus on the cross to hasten His death before sunset preceding the Sabbath, because He was already dead.

Psalms 22:18 says: “They part my garments among them, and cast lots upon my vesture.”

The 53rd chapter of Isaiah says that Christ will be despised and rejected of men (53:3), wounded for our transgressions (53:5), open not his mouth in his own defense (53:7), make his grave with the rich (53:9), and be executed alongside transgressors (53:12).

Within the hostile environment that Jesus operated throughout much of His ministry (Jn. 7:1), but especially during His final week in Jerusalem (Jn. 7:32; 8:59; 10:31), how is it that God the Father can orchestrate the timing of the crucifixion down to the precise day of the Passover, and the traditional hour of the day the Passover lamb is killed?

Jesus is betrayed by Judas after the Last Supper on Thursday evening, is hastily tried at the house of Caiaphas very late on Thursday night and early Friday morning, the sentence of death is ratified by the Sanhedrin at daybreak on Friday, the prisoner is placed before Pilate for formal sentencing early Friday morning, and Jesus is hanging on the cross around 9:00 in the morning of Friday the Passover.

Jesus dies around 3:00 or 4:00 that afternoon, the time that the Passover lambs are traditionally killed.

God the Father steps on the accelerator pedal to speed up events before and during that last week, first by creating a sense of urgency on the part of the religious leaders, through Jesus raising Lazarus from the dead, and His triumphal entrance into Jerusalem.

God then alternately taps with His foot on the brakes and then touches the accelerator pedal again lightly…through the indecisiveness of the religious leaders on the one hand…and the information that Judas provides on the other.  This achieves just the right velocity to get Jesus crucified within the narrow time window between sundown Thursday and sundown Friday, according to all of the ancient Old Testament prophecies on the very day of the Passover.

This is an incredibly difficult thing to orchestrate over the span of a three-and-one-half-year long ministry, when the life of Jesus was in danger on several occasions, starting at the beginning of His ministry in His own hometown of Nazareth (Lk. 4:29).

This achievement is even more remarkable considering that the Pharisees, scribes, and religious leaders in Jerusalem were not prophets of God being led by His Spirit, but deadly adversaries in opposition to the ways of God.  God was using them for His purposes without their knowledge or awareness of this fact.

The Pharisees, Sadducees, and scribes could have arrested Jesus on any night of that final week on His way back from Jerusalem to the Mount of Olives (Lk. 21:37).  They could have arrested Him any morning of that week on His way to teach in the Temple.

They did not need Judas to tell them the whereabouts of Jesus.[1]  His movements were so well known that “the people came early in the morning to him in the temple, to hear him” (Lk. 21:38).  A crowd of people was awaiting Him alongside the road during His triumphal entrance into the city (Jn. 12:12).

The gospels tell us that the religious leaders did fear the reaction of the people should they make a move against Jesus (Mk. 12:12; Lk. 19:47-48; 20:6).  That was certainly a restraining element in their calculations.  But the religious leaders also feared Jesus Himself.  Jesus was an unknown quantity.  They were not even sure if it was possible to arrest Him (Jn. 7:30; 7:45-46; 8:20; 8:59; 10:39).  They knew they wanted to eliminate Him, they just did not know exactly when and how they would do it.

God Himself provided the answer.

It took a member of the inner group of His closest disciples, Judas Iscariot, to change allegiance from Jesus over to the religious leaders, to become the means of propulsion that God used to govern and adjust the speed of the events that led to the midnight trial and the Passover crucifixion.  Being one of the twelve apostles, Judas naturally heard Jesus speaking to the group as they approached Jerusalem that final week, preparing them beforehand for His upcoming death and resurrection (Mt. 20:17-19; Mk. 10:32-34; Lk. 18:31-34).

The value of Judas’ information that week to the religious rulers was not so much the whereabouts of Jesus, which many people seemed to know about, but the fact that someone in His inner circle was telling them that Jesus was speaking mysteriously and unexplainably about His upcoming death.  That was the unexpected and welcome information that was worth thirty pieces of silver from Caiaphas the High Priest and the other rulers, not just where Jesus was at any particular moment.

Luke 18:34 tells us that the twelve apostles did not understand what Jesus meant when He told them, as they journeyed toward Jerusalem, that He would be put to death and rise the third day.  Even though Judas, like the other eleven apostles, would not have understood these words of Jesus, yet he could still pass along this critical information word-for-word to the religious leaders, having heard them first-hand from Jesus.

Jesus knew that Judas would betray Him (Jn. 6:64; 6:70-71; 13:11).  There seems to be a sort of understanding between Jesus and Judas that Jesus would be waiting in the Garden of Gethsemane that Thursday night, when Jesus says to Judas: “What thou doest, do quickly” (Jn 13:27).  It is this startling, confirming information, accurately perceived by Judas during the Last Supper, and hurriedly communicated by him to the rulers, that sets in motion the final decision by Caiaphas the High Priest to go forward with the destruction of Jesus (Mt. 26:3-5).

But all of the proper proceedings must now be started and consummated by sundown the following day, before the start of the Sabbath.  Criminals executed by crucifixion could not be left dead on their crosses after sunset at the start of the Friday night Sabbath.  That is why the legs of the two thieves crucified next to Jesus were broken that afternoon, to facilitate their death and removal that same afternoon.

Add to this the complication that the Passover was the first day of the week-long Feast of Unleavened Bread.

If Jesus could not be tried, executed, and disposed of that Friday, he would have had to be held over…under their custody…until after the festival week.  Any problem or glitch in the proceedings that did not result in a conviction and a crucifixion the following day, could have unforeseen and very unpleasant consequences regarding the reaction of the people, for these rulers.

The thing had to be carried out to its conclusion quickly, before public sentiment could galvanize one way or the other.

This explains why the party of Jesus lingers in the Garden of Gethsemane much later than usual, causing the disciples to fall asleep.  This is why Caiaphas himself probably went to Pilate late Thursday night (a reasonable inference, though not recorded in scripture) to get Pilate’s pre-arranged consent for the course of action the Jewish leaders proposed to take the following day.

This is why Pilate’s wife, becoming aware of the subject nature of the unusual late night visit of Caiaphas to speak with her husband, had bad dreams that very night about Jesus (Mt. 27:19), and sent a note forewarning Pilate at daybreak the next morning.

This is why Pilate seems to go back on his agreement with Caiaphas from the night before, to summarily go along with the Jew’s death sentence for Jesus, and instead attempts first…to set Jesus free.  This greatly upsets the already committed Jewish leaders (Jn. 18:30).  Pilate then proceeds to wash his hands of the whole affair (Mt. 27:24).

This is why Judas knows exactly where to take the hastily assembled group of armed men carrying lanterns and torches, when Jesus and the apostles should otherwise normally be asleep at that late hour elsewhere at the Mount of Olives.  This is why Jesus waits and stays where He is, even though He probably can see the procession of lanterns and torches a long way off as the crowd approaches (Mt. 26:46).  Jesus also knows that Judas is heading for the Garden of Gethsemane.

[1] Frank Morison, Who Moved the Stone (Downers Grove, Illinois: InterVarsity Press) 30-42.  The reconstructions of the events of the final week in Jerusalem described in this chapter, are taken from this insightful book.

The Event of the Cross 1

“All we like sheep have gone astray; we have turned every one to his own way, and the Lord hath laid on Him the iniquity of us all.”                                                                                                                (Isa. 53:6)

When Jesus Christ confronted the religious leaders in Jerusalem, as recorded in the four gospels, at that time the Pharisees, Sadducees, lawyers, and scribes were in possession of the worldly political seat of power.  They had the power to influence the opinion of the populace against Jesus, to throw out of the synagogue anyone who professed belief in Jesus, to slander His person, to marginalize His teachings, and eventually have Jesus crucified by the Romans as a political and societal enemy of the state (Jn. 19:12).

A small, exclusive club of spiritually blind and worldly self-centered men was in political control in Jerusalem during the ministry of Jesus.

Yet during this entire period, God is able to engineer and accomplish all of His plans and designs for the salvation of mankind, which He meticulously laid-out ahead of time in the Old Testament messianic prophecies and “types” of Christ…hundreds of years earlier.

This is an important observation as we approach the last days.  God worked His complete agenda for mankind’s salvation within and through the political plans and schemes of evil men during the same time period these men thought they had the upper hand and were in control of events.

This gives us a foreglimpse of the scenario that may repeat itself again in the upcoming end-times.

An argument can be made that it is the violently lethal differences of opinion that form the basis for the martyrdom of Jesus of Nazareth as the Passover Lamb of God sacrifice for our sins.  It is the heat of the conflict created within God’s resolution of the difference between right and wrong, and truth and error, which surprisingly generates the outcome of Christ’s sacrifice on the cross as the foundation of our salvation.

That God is creatively brilliant enough to mint a heavenly coin of salvation, having the exposure of error and falsehood on one side of the coin, and love-filled redemption from sin through the atonement of Christ on the cross…and resurrection from the dead…on the other side of the coin, is remarkable beyond all human reckoning.  This plainly tells us that God can move through real-life events and circumstances having the darkest outward appearance of adversity and opposition, to accomplish His plans with creative imagination and foresight to rival the best of modern fictional suspense novelists.

The religious leaders in Jerusalem had the political power, but God had control of all of the events, situations, and circumstances to achieve the outcome He wanted.

This is one of the most important revelations in the Bible, which is understood and acknowledged on a surface level in all of Christendom, yet is seldom explored very deeply.  Whoever can supernaturally shape events controls everything.

There is only one divine, all-powerful God in all of existence.  This is one of the things Jesus is trying to tell us about our choices, and the direction of our lives, in The Sermon on the Mount.  This is one of the foundations of faith in Jesus Christ.  This is why Christians walking in the Spirit surrender all to Jesus.  This is why people of faith in the Bible, in the midst of their calling, give up control of events to God.

God is so intelligent and resourceful that He can even take the evil actions of worldly people and turn them into good outcomes.

The action of crucifying the Son of God cannot get any more darkly evil, yet God turned it into the greatest blessing for good for all eternity.

If the worst that evil can do, unjustly condemning and executing Jesus the Son of God, ends up actually providing the means for the best outcome in human history…the salvation and deliverance of mankind from sin…then evil does not stand a chance when people choose God.  God is so intelligent and resourceful that He can take the very ammunition that evil shoots at spiritual righteousness, and turn it back around upon itself.

Although the human side of Jesus did not look forward joyfully toward the physical agony of the cross, Jesus was not afraid of evil.  Jesus knew that God the Father would take the deadly attack of evil upon Himself, as symbolized in the cross, turning this around into eternal salvation for mankind.

When we are safely “in Christ” through faith, and because “all things work together for good for them that love God, to them who are the called according to his purpose” (Rom. 8:28), we do not have to be afraid of the appearance of evil coming against us in the situations and circumstances of life.

This includes the upcoming end-times.

The point here is to illustrate that it was the event of the cross of Christ, spread-out in time over many finely detailed circumstances, which not only divided spiritual light from darkness, but at the same time demonstrated God’s complete mastery over the affairs of men.  It did not matter that the religious leaders in Jerusalem had the political and social power.  God’s use of situations and circumstances is on a level that is way above the temporal political powers on earth.

Desperation Can Push Us into Reliance upon God 2

In every situation in the New Testament, when anyone approaches Jesus in faith with a need or a request, no matter how desperate or seemingly impossible, Jesus always succeeds.  When people approached Jesus in faith, I can think of no example where Jesus was not able to heal an illness, provide for a need, or solve a problem.

Only three occasions come to mind where Jesus actually failed in the New Testament.

Because of people’s unbelief, Jesus was not able to perform many miracles in His hometown of Nazareth (Mk. 6:5-6).  Because of people’s unbelief, Jesus was not able to persuade and win over the majority of the Pharisees, scribes, and teachers of the Law, and was eventually crucified through their instigation.  Because of people’s unbelief, the city of Jerusalem was not able to receive the blessings and protection that God had in mind for it and suffered instead the wrath of the Roman Empire in A.D. 70 as the Roman general Titus destroyed the city.

The only time that God ever “fails,” is when people or nations push Him away.  In every situation where there is some measure of faith involved, Jesus is able to save a wedding feast by turning water into wine, heal lepers, restore sight to the blind, raise the dead, feed thousands of people in a desert, calm a storm at sea, and walk harmlessly through a crowd of people intent upon throwing Him off a cliff.  In these situations and circumstances, Jesus never fails.

When we combine the fact that God never fails, and the concept as presented in this book that the plans of God for people maneuver them to a point of having to rely solely upon Him, above and beyond their own personal gifts and talents, we get a better picture of the direction the Christian life is supposed to be going.

This is why so many verses, stories, and parables in the Bible talk about placing our faith and trust in God as opposed to self-reliance (Isa. 53:6; Prov. 3:5-6).  The idea that God is still in control, even in situations and circumstances that are difficult is sometimes portrayed in the Bible just below the surface of a particular story.  Other times, this idea is clearly expressed.

For example, when Abraham receives his calling from God to leave the town of Haran and travel to the promised land of Canaan, it is implied in this story that he must thereby leave behind all of his Haran-based plans, designs, and schemes that are now displaced by the new Canaan-based plan of God for him.

Not only is Abraham heading off into new territory geographically, but also into new territory spiritually.  What lies just below the surface in this story is that once Abraham commits to following God into this new unconventional life-script, Abraham becomes completely and totally dependent upon God to bring about the successful completion of God’s promise to him.

Because Abraham does believe God, and because God never fails, God’s promise to Abraham does eventually come true.  But not before God is able to fashion Abraham, through a series of well-planned and orchestrated events, into the type of person that can rightly be called the “father of faith.”

1 Peter 4:12 reads “Beloved, think it not strange concerning the fiery trial that is to test you, as though some strange thing happened unto you.”

This verse…and many similar verses in the Bible…expressly say that periods in our Christian lives will have situations and circumstances that are above and beyond our ability to handle.  If we can look back upon, or are currently in situations that require us to cry out to God “save me, I perish,” then we are learning lessons of faith and trust in God that match the experiences of people of faith in the Bible who reached similar points of desperation.

We are then being crafted into overcomers who can face any and all of life’s challenges with patient confidence through our personal relationship with a trustworthy and faithful God.

Desperation Can Push Us into Reliance upon God 1

“My brethren, count it all joy when ye fall into various trials, Knowing this, that the trying of your faith worketh patience.  But let patience have her perfect work, that ye may be perfect and entire, lacking nothing.”                                                                                                   (Jas. 1:2-4)

In the Gospels and in the book of Acts of the New Testament…there are many examples of human crisis, desperation, and need.

Luke 8:22 through 8:56 presents four such examples of people who have reached the point of desperation in their lives, who turn to Jesus for help.

They were the disciples in jeopardy in the storm at sea…the man who had the legion of demons cast out…the woman who touched the border of Jesus’ garment…and Jairus the ruler of a synagogue.

In Luke 8:22-25, the disciples and Jesus are in a boat crossing a lake, when a strong wind creates a storm dangerous enough to place their lives at risk.  But Jesus fell asleep at the beginning of their journey across the lake and is still asleep as water from the waves are coming into and filling up the boat.

The disciples wake up Jesus, and excitedly say to Him “Master, master, we perish.”  Jesus rebukes the wind and the waves, and there was calm where moments before there was a perilous storm.

Luke 8:25 then reads “And he said unto them, Where is your faith?  And they, being afraid, marveled, saying one to another, What manner of man is this! For he commandeth even the winds and water, and they obey him.”

Because this story is so brief, and the happy ending comes so quickly, it is easy to gloss over the serious import of this story.

On board this boat were probably most of the apostles, although none of them are mentioned specifically by name.  John was probably on board, who wrote the fourth gospel, three letters to the churches, and the book of The Revelation.  Peter was probably on board, who by tradition provided the information for the writing of the gospel of Mark, wrote two letters to the churches, and figures prominently in the book of Acts and in the first century church.

Matthew was probably also on board the floundering boat, who wrote the first gospel.  A good portion of the entire New Testament, not to mention Jesus Himself, was riding in that boat on the lake.

For Peter and Andrew, and James and John, who were all fishermen by trade, to awaken Jesus and to say they were on the verge of perishing…meant that the storm was serious.  To the apostles the moment was desperate.

The solution that Jesus brings to this otherwise life-and-death situation is not on the list of normal responses to save a boat that is floundering at sea.  We do not know what the apostles had in mind for Jesus to do during this crisis, but it probably fell somewhere within the realm of solid advice on how to reach land while working together as a team bailing water out of the boat.  The idea that Jesus would stand up in the boat and rebuke the wind and the waves to produce an almost instant calm was a solution to the problem that was way above and beyond the possible options the apostles might have possibly imagined.

The story of the man who had the legion of demons cast out can certainly be described as desperate.  He lived as a naked madman amongst rocks and caves, and when the demons were cast out of him by Jesus they entered into a herd of swine that ran headlong over a cliff into the sea and drowned.

This situation is so far beyond the human ability to resolve in terms of counseling or psychology, that even today we must marvel at the outcome of this man sitting at the feet of Jesus, clothed, and in his right mind.  This story seems commonplace for Jesus, only because it is mixed in among so many other miracles, healings, and deliverances Jesus performed.

The woman who was healed by touching the border of Jesus’ garment had an issue of blood for twelve years, and had spent all of her finances on physicians without being cured.  She was desperate to the point of thinking within herself that, although she could not gain personal access to Jesus amongst all of the people who crowded around Him, if she could just reach out and touch His garment as He walked by she might be healed.  In this brief but wonderful story, Jesus is the last hope for this woman.

Jairus, the ruler of a synagogue, reaches the point of desperation on account of the deadly illness of his twelve year old daughter, his only child.  Jairus falls at the feet of Jesus, asking Him to come to his house and heal his daughter.  The situation becomes hopeless when the house servant arrives to tell Jairus that his daughter has died.  But Jairus has already committed himself to include Jesus in his personal crisis, and Jesus does not abandon the situation.  Jesus has the power to resolve this impossible problem, even to the point of being able to bring a young woman back from the dead.

The Spiritual Vision of John the Baptist 2

One of the basic lessons of the life of John the Baptist that applies to all Christians…is that the godly life may not always appear to be successful, at times, in the eyes of the world.

No one had any idea what John the Baptist was doing, quietly allowing God to prepare him in the desert for his spectacular upcoming ministry.  No one in Canaan knew at the time Abraham showed up that the future “father of faith” had arrived.  Joseph appears to be a complete failure in Potiphar’s house and in Pharaoh’s prison.

Conventional wisdom would say that Moses was committing suicide by going to Egypt and demanding from Pharaoh that he let the children of Israel go.

As King Saul is pursuing David on several occasions to kill him, David is only separated from him by a hilltop.  Considering the potential that David showed at the beginning of his career, in slaying Goliath and in his early military victories against the Philistines, some people at the time might conclude that David in his middle to late twenties had become a huge disappointment.

Everything about Jesus…what He says, teaches, and does is unconventional.

When we accept Jesus into our lives, we become new people with improved characters and attitudes, but we also have a new faith in Christ that can bring the unconventional, supernatural aspect of Jesus into our own set of life events and circumstances.

Christians who want to follow God’s plan for their lives must confront and overcome the negative pull of worldly conventional thinking.

God is not for…or against…wealth or poverty, nor is He for or against the appearance of success or failure.  These things are totally beside the point in a biblical journey of faith applied to our lives.  God is not assisted by wealth and success or limited by poverty and the appearance of failure.

We are supposed to surrender all to Jesus right where we find ourselves…to listen for His voice to become a light and a blessing to ourselves and to those around us…and to be open and accessible to God’s leading wherever that takes us.

This is one of the lessons we can learn from the enormously powerful and world-shaking ministry of John the Baptist.

God knows that some people have the God-given abilities to become an outward success in this world.  God knows how to reach these types of people and call them by His Spirit to respond to His love, and to surrender their lives to His plans and purposes.

God also knows how to reach people who have gifts and talents that are not likely to produce great worldly acclaim or wealth, and to craft lives for them that are more fulfilling and meaningful than anything they could have imagined for themselves.

If faith in God is described in the Bible as comparable to fine gold (1 Pet. 1:7), then even the most average Christian can aspire to and experience a world-class life following Jesus Christ.

Finally, if we find truth like John the Baptist (Jn. 16:13)…we will also find divine love (1 Cor. 13).  The two go together…truth and love.

The power and the conviction of the words of John the Baptist…that captured the heart of the nation of Israel as the forerunner in preparation for the coming of the ministry of Jesus Christ (Mal. 4:5-6)…contained genuine compassion, caring, and the love of God…which are co-equal and inseparable components of truth.

The Spiritual Vision of John the Baptist 1

“If ye, then, be risen with Christ, seek those things which are above, where Christ sitteth on the right hand of God.  Set your affection on things above, not on things on the earth.  For ye are dead, and your life is hidden with Christ in God.”                                             (Col. 3:1-3)

John the Baptist, through the Holy Spirit, was able to spiritually see the multitudes of people in Israel who needed repentance, salvation, and reform.

When John the Baptist captures God’s love-filled vision of repentance for Israel, and begins to preach the message that God gave him in the wilderness, the New Testament says: “Then went out to him Jerusalem, and all Judea, and all the region round about the Jordan” (Mt. 3:5).

Paul, in the midst of his evangelical ministry to the Mediterranean world, says that God has set forth the apostles as being last (1 Cor. 4:9).

Only from the low vantage point of humility can the leaders of the early Christian church spiritually see the vast field of lost people ready for repentance and harvesting into the kingdom of God.  A large number of people were ready to turn to God in first-century Israel and in the Greco-Roman Mediterranean world, but the Pharisees, scribes, and other religious leaders in Jerusalem were unable to see, much less minister to this need.

Self-centeredness and self-importance blocks our spiritual vision of the needs of other people.

The Pharisees and scribes unwittingly revealed their true character by criticizing Jesus for associating with damaged, needy, and broken people, when they ask the disciples: “Why eateth your Master with publicans and sinners?” (Mt. 9:11).

Jesus said that He came to “seek and to save that which was lost” (Lk. 19:10).  The narrowly exclusive outreach of the Pharisees and scribes does not include the outcasts and undesirables of society, because the Pharisees are sitting in self-righteous pride, high atop the thrones of their lives.

Lucifer certainly has no intention of seeking and saving the lost sheep of Israel.  Jesus says of the Pharisees and scribes, at the height of their power and influence, and while the Temple in Jerusalem is fully functioning as a religious institution, that these men are as the blind leading the blind (Mt. 15:14).

The Pharisees and scribes are spiritually blind because they cannot see the multitudes of people in Israel, ready and willing to come to John, hear his message at the river Jordan, and to confess their sins and be water baptized.

The Pharisees and scribes are blind because they cannot see, from their high perch atop the thrones of their hearts, those people in Israel who are spiritually sick and in need of God the Great Physician (Mt. 9:12).

John the Baptist, Jesus, and the early church Christians in Jerusalem have to do the work that the Pharisees and scribes were supposed to be doing, but were not, because it takes a life genuinely lived according to the cross of Christ to be able to spiritually see, empathize with, and commit ourselves to meeting the needs of lost and broken people.

The Pharisees and chief priests revealed their true heart condition when they said: “If we let him thus alone, all men will believe on him; and the Romans shall come and take away both our place and nation” (Jn. 11:48).

If we are called, if we are prepared for ministry through the experience of the cross, if we have God’s vision of the needs of the lost in this world…then no one can take away our place except by the express will of God Almighty (1 Pet. 3:13).  By saying that the Romans can come and take away their place, these religious leaders are unknowingly admitting that their worldly-based authority does not derive from a divine, unshakable godly calling to minister to the lost people of this world.

Even though multitudes of people were ready to come to the Jordan River to repent and be baptized, God could not enlist the Pharisees and scribes to this great work, because they could not even see the need.  If Christians today want to go forth into their Christian ministries with their spiritual eyes fully open to be able to see the needs of others, the road of preparation that leads there is the lowly way of the cross.

Spiritual Pride Needs a Context 3

We Are Emissaries of the King         

It might be well to pause for a moment of reflection here.

The apostles were in the inner circle of being disciples of the Creator of the Universe, the eternal Word of God.  Yet none of these men showed signs in their subsequent early church ministries of trying to cash-in on their relationship with Jesus Christ to make something of themselves.

The same can be said of the prophets in the Old Testament.  The price-tag of being in the confidence of the Almighty God is having the high character trait of selflessness, of being willing to be trustworthy and dependable agents of the king…of not seeking our own interests.

Imagine the privilege and responsibility of being called to be even a “minor” prophet in the Old Testament by God Himself…to be trusted with God’s message and mission to take to other people.

This requires the highest character in conformity to Jesus Christ through the Holy Spirit.  Serving God the Father, through Jesus Christ, in the power of the Holy Spirit, is traveling in the highest company.

To aspire to this requires the most sober humility in a human being.  Being entrusted to take God’s redemptive message of life out into a broken world is a serious endeavor, allowing no room for self-adulation or personal acclaim.  This is the lesson in placing a small, innocent child in the midst of the disciples, as an example of the correct selfless spirit in serving God faithfully in any capacity.

People will try to push people up in Christendom (Jn. 6:15).

If I am “somebody” this does absolutely nothing for you.  Only if Jesus is somebody important in our lives does something happen for the good.  The right approach is to lift up Jesus, not people.  Being a selfless servant of God is what produces eternally beneficial results.

Every Christian should be on guard and aware of spiritual pride.  In everything we do, but especially in our Christian service, we should remember the insightfully classic words of the Greek Gentiles seeking an audience with Jesus by approaching Philip during the Passover feast in Jerusalem: “Sir, we would see Jesus” (Jn. 12:21).

As professing Christians, we should always be pointing people’s vision toward Jesus and away from ourselves.