Construction Management Introduction 1

            Mass-production assembly-lines that are manufacturing 100,000 units of the same identical product at a single factory location, for example, thoroughly debug the manufacturing process ahead of time at the initial trial-run phase to ensure a smooth and error-free assembly once mass-production begins. 

            This enables each product to be manufactured at its lowest cost-per-unit.

            One condition for the mass-production of a large number of the same repetitive product at one assembly-line factory is that the finished size of the product must be small enough to be assembled at one location and then shipped/transported to other locations.

            In the exceptional cases of manufactured things that are very large in size, they have the required feature of mobility…of being able to independently transport themselves by land, sea, or air. 

            A navy aircraft carrier is built in a shipyard dry-dock, and when completed is lowered into the water and sailed off to its fleet destination. 

            A jet passenger airliner is assembled inside a hangar, and then rolled outside when completed, fueled-up, and flown into service. 

            A city bus is likewise assembled indoors in a factory, is rolled outside, is fueled-up, and then driven on the highways to its destination of use. 

            New houses are also mass-produced items, but are physically too large and heavy to be fully assembled at one factory location and then transported overland to individual building sites. 

            This reality requires houses to be individually assembled piece-by-piece on geographically isolated sites spread-out all over the countryside…thus breaking up the traditional assembly-line debugging process into literally tens of thousands of separate, disconnected units.

            New housing construction projects are so isolated in terms of communicating common debugging information that two similar projects going up side-by-side on adjacent sites, built by different companies, can each be making some of the same costly mistakes without either one knowing about or being able to benefit from the other’s experience.

            The result is that hundreds of thousands of builders, architects, engineers, interior designers, subcontractors, and individual tradespersons find themselves on the uphill slope of the learning curve repeating many of the same hard-earned lessons.

Author: Barton Jahn

I worked in building construction as a field superintendent and project manager. I have four books published by McGraw-Hill on housing construction (1995-98) under Bart Jahn, and have eight Christian books self-published through Kindle Direct Publishing (KDP). I have a bachelor of science degree in construction management from California State University Long Beach. I grew up in Southern California, was an avid surfer, and am fortunate enough to have always lived within one mile of the ocean. I discovered writing at the age of 30, and it is now one of my favorite activities. I am currently working on more books on building construction.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: