Figure        shows the elevation view of the front exterior of a particular house, including the color scheme accent colors.

In this particular case, the elevation drawings from the building plans were reduced down to 11×17 inches, and each wall area was color coded and labeled a particular paint color.

These color-scheme elevation drawings can be done by the architect, builder, city or county art committee, or as in this case, a professional color design consultant.

An elevation view of each exterior side of the structure typically shows only the flat surfaces facing the viewer.  The wall surfaces perpendicular to the viewer, such as the pop-outs around the windows and the garage door in this example, can only be illustrated as vertical or horizontal lines in the two-dimensional view.

Because a line on a drawing is not thick enough to be cross-hatched or color-coded to indicate a particular accent paint color, these areas are sometimes misses on color scheme drawings for new housing projects.  Without identifying the specific paint color for every wall surface, the painter must then guess whether a particular accent paint color stops at and outside corner or continues around to the un-shown inside corner (being the same line in elevation view).

The painter rather than the architect or the color consultant must then make numerous small “judgment calls” regarding exterior painting…and each decision also then becomes a matter of time expediency that cannot wait for a field visit from designers for a definitive answer.

Wall surfaces that are perpendicular to the elevation view can have their accent colors called out using arrow-lines, or can be illustrated using three-dimensional sketches of the areas in question as shown in Fig.         .

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