This book describes management tools such as schedule charts, walks checklists, homebuyer options selections spreadsheets, and cheats sheets.

All these paper tools require enough wall space to be displayed.  These and other informational aids…such as contact phone number lists and calendars…provide information at a glance…thereby saving time and improving efficiency.  The typical 8×12 or 8×16 foot trailer simply does not have enough wall space.

An archaic mindset of some builders is that by providing an inhospitable and too small office trailer for the field staff…that this will encourage the superintendents to spend more time out in the actual construction site and less time “camped-out” in the construction trailer.

This old-fashioned approach backfires at the end of the workday when superintendents need to stay onsite to do paperwork after the tradespeople leave.  If the construction office trailer is an uninviting place to work…the superintendents are more apt to leave the project each day when the construction activity concludes.

In my opinion, the best approach is to provide a construction office trailer that is adequately furnished and equipped to function as a field office, have a comprehensive construction program in place and functioning so that field staff has clearly assigned tasks to perform daily, and have an organized overall operation in the field for between 8 to 10 hours per day on weekdays with no “catch-up” work occurring on weekends…no matter how much time is spent inside or outside the trailer by the builder’s field staff.